Tag Archives: Water

Through My Window

Through My Window
Through My Window

It is amazing the small things we miss because we are so wrapped up in the business of the regular day-to-day – the falling rain, the blossoming flowers, the small shaft of sunlight as the clouds part. I am just as much a culprit of that as well. I often times get so wrapped up in programming at work that I forget to observe the things outside. Well, I broke away from the monotony and observed, through my window, tulips blossoming in the sunlight behind a pane of wet glass.

The act of using the texture made by the streaking water droplets on the glass was very deliberate as I wanted to bring attention both to the water and the flowers in the background. I could think of no other way to present it that would illustrate those elements together and on par. In fact, the water provided something more akin to a texture to the overall image.The lighting played its part in making the image what it is, lightly kissing the flowers helping them emerge from the surrounding dark green vegetation.

Could I have made the image sharper? Sure I could. But, the purpose of the image was not about conveying a surgical copy but to convey a mood. A mood that is often felt when observing the rain fall. It is more of a feeling of being purified as particles are washed away and everything seems to burst with renewed vigour. That is what I felt when I saw the scene and what I wanted to convey when I shot this image through my window.

Montauk Point Coastline

Montauk Point Coastline
Montauk Point Coastline

Oops, I did it again. I revisited the Montauk Point area to have a look at it given the changing conditions and because things were warming up – yaaay Spring. I had also planned on exploring more of the area like the coastline which I hadn’t had an opportunity to do on my previous trip. What I encountered however was a lot more than I bargained for.

I had thought that my visit would have been much like the previous one with the lighthouse being inaccessible. But as it so happens, on this visit, the lighthouse had resumed its services opening up to visitors. This time around, I had to pay a little to get into the parking lot and yes, I had to pay to get into the lighthouse as well but it was worth every “penny” – paid by credit card. Nevertheless, I got into the lighthouse which I later understood is currently unmanned – It operates automatically. Further, the rest of the lighthouse has been converted into a museum illustrating the history of the lighthouse and the Montauk Point. The discussions given by the guides were both educational and refreshing but the real treat of the visit was getting the opportunity to ascend the spiral staircase into the light enclosure. It was there I shot the photograph depicted above showing the jagged coastline of the Point.

The Montauk Point Coastline has been etched by the Atlantic Ocean over years of slow and continuous erosion. This has created some rather steep bluffs which look out into the waters. During stormy conditions, the beach area which is visible in the photograph is not accessible so it was very fortunate that I got an opportunity to make this capture. However, the natural formation of this beach front is beautiful and is the reason why I selected it as one of the photographs to post of my visit.

In retrospect, it would have been nice if I had the opportunity for me to set up my tripod to take this photograph and properly compose the shot. Given the narrow staircase, limited room to work within and limitations as to where visitors are allowed to access, it was not at all possible to properly plan out the shot as I would have wanted to. But, that was one of the limitations of  my revisit to the Montauk Point Coastline. Regardless, I enjoyed every bit of it.

Breaking Dawn

Breaking Dawn
Breaking Dawn

This is not the final installment to the Twilight saga – far from it. This is to introduce the real “Breaking Dawn”. The photo in this post was taken at Robert H. Treman State Park in Ithaca New York. And, to me, is a much accurate representation of breaking dawn.

This is one photograph that I could not possible convert to black and white because if I did, I would loose the effect of the warm sunrise over the crest of the waterfall. The warm, golden yellow color seen here is indicative of the soft glow seen from the sun as it slowly creeps its way into forest areas. The atmosphere at the top of the falls was a sort of hazy mist filled with the moisture liberated by the splashing water of the falls. The lit area to the left of the photograph define the contours of the  jagged, rocky terrain lining the falls and provide depth to the image. The sun rays almost split the image in half creating an equally sized shadow area where the milky, white water of the falls cascade down to the pool below.

In contrast to the well-lit, warm, sunny area, we have the cooler parts of the falls where the water runs through. The falls cascade no less than three times, zigzagging, carving its way through the terrain until it finally terminates at the pool. The white water of the fall is indicative of the motion of the water as it descends through the rocks.

Indeed the serene scene evokes a mood of tranquility and in some ways a mood of refreshment – not only because of the cool, flowing waters of the falls but also because of the directional light cast by the rising sun. A mood which is further emphasized by its title – “Breaking Dawn”.

Fishing on the Dock of the Bay

Fishing on the Dock of the Bay
Fishing on the Dock of the Bay

If the title sounds vaguely familiar, then you may have already started humming the familiar tune by Otis Redding i.e. “Sitting on the Dock of the Bay.” If you haven’t heard it before, then I must be really getting old. But, I certainly recommend that you jump over to YouTube and grab a listen. “Fishing on the Dock of the Bay” is a small play on words, but, I think it still carries the spirit of the song’s chorus line.

The chorus line went much like this:

I’m sittin’ on the dock of the bay
Watching the tide roll away
Ooo, I’m just sittin’ on the dock of the bay
Wastin’ time

And, believe me, those words resonated when I saw this fisherman fishing on Onondaga lake just seconds after the sun had dipped below the tops of the trees bordering the eastern side of the lake. I am pretty sure he was not wasting time, rather passing the time away engaged in activity that he enjoys. But, I can’t deny the thoughts that the photo conjures up with its still waters, pastel-like colors in the sky and tree tops and the easy going mood the scene evokes.

My only regret, no my only desire, was that I wish I had a slightly longer lens something that would compress the photo even more and blur the trees in the background just a little to offset the fisherman from the rest of the scenery. And, it would allow me to do something that Robert Capa always preached, “If your picture isn’t good enough, you’re not close enough.” But, until I win the lottery and get a longer lens, or by some miracle I learn how to walk water, I will be content with capturing the spirit of the scene regardless of the lens I have available. So, I hope you enjoy, Fishing on the Dock of the Bay.

Apple Nectar

Apple Nectar
Apple Nectar

On Sunday, I accompanied some friends to an orchard for some apple picking. Being my first ever trip to do any sort of apple picking, I decided to carry my camera with me to capture the orchards being harvested by the visitors and to get some interesting shots of apples.It was particularly overcast and wet that day and that provided excellent diffused light throughout the orchard as well as interesting water patterns which I will illustrate in subsequent posts. However, this combination of conditions allowed me to make the photograph observed on the left which has been titled “Apple Nectar”.

thanks to the light, misty rain which fell constantly, the water accumulated on the apples hanging in the orchards in beads and when the beads became to heavy, the streaked down the sides of the apple, formed droplets and fell to the ground. In this photograph, I chose to ignore the tops of the apple and focus on this one droplet of water which had accumulated in the constant rain and was preparing to eventually drop.To eliminate as much distraction as possible, I used a shallow depth of field, hiding the rows of orchard trees which stretched out in equally spaced rows from one end of the field to the other. Further, I chose to keep color in this image because I think the color itself helped to draw attention to the fruit which was situated in the upper left hand corner of the photo.

In essence, I was trying to capture the droplet of water as if it were nectar oozing out of the apple, filled with the sweet juice that lay within, hence the name Apple Nectar.However, I will leave it up to the viewer to determine whether I was effective or not in presenting the image in a way which communicated this idea.

Southwick Beach Sunset

Southwick Beach Sunset
Southwick Beach Sunset

It was April 8; Four rather restless photographers followed the setting of the sun to Southwick Beach Park in hopes of catching an amazing sunset. Being one of those photographers, I too got wrapped up in the moment searching for a good sunset shot. After pacing back and forth a long the beach front and some of the surrounding area looking for a good place to set up my tripod I selected the one  which allowed me to compose the trunk of a partially submerged tree and some driftwood into the same scene.

The waters of Lake Ontario had become choppy and started to churn more violently as the sun started to set and the sand from the beach began migrating in small wisps as the wind of the lake kicked-up. Reluctant to leave until I had captured the image that I wanted, I remained at my camera, shivering occasionally, in spite of the rapidly dropping temperatures, dwindling day light and inhospitable conditions.The result after more than two weeks of editing, walking away and editing again is the image in this post of the Southwick Beach Sunset. Although, I have been told that it is a beautiful capture, I still feel that I have not captured the essence of that sunset. But, I guess that is just me.

Sodus Point Light House

Sodus Point Light House
Sodus Point Light House

There is something classical and enduring about light houses. Something about them suggest a metaphorical statement of an enduring light during the darkest times; Or, a spotlight to point the way and steer you clear of danger. This is the same feeling I get whenever I review this photo I took three weeks back at Sodus Point, NY. Sodus Point is a small bay town which sits on the shores of Lake Ontrario in Central New York. If you were to ever visit, the place looks like it sprang from an old fishing village.  I truly don’t know the full history of the town and to really learn that I would have to get that information from one of the locals which I did not have much opportunity to do.

But, back to the lighthouse and its appeal. The photo on the left truly doesn’t do it any justice as I had to crop it somewhat so that the lighthouse would be visible. However, the brooding dark sky really added to its appeal and added atmosphere to the scene that was better experienced rather than simply shot on camera.

What the photograph does not indicate is the frigid, windy temperatures that had to be endured to capture this. I took several shots of this lighthouse because the wind was so strong and constant, that my camera would shake even though it was placed on a steady tripod. I even took extra precautionary steps to avoid camera shake by using my remote trigger. Using the remote trigger also helped me to keep my poor digits warm too. In the end though, I was satisfied with the result and I present it here – the Sodus Point Light House.

Penguin Passion

Penguin Passion
Penguin Passion

By nature, penguins are curious animals. Once someone or something enters their personal space they start investigating. Children are just as curious. So what happens when two equally curious creatures meet? – a moment of excitement which I think I captured here in “Penguin Passion”.

I will have to say that this young girl really inspired me. Just seeing how interested and excited she was in encountering this curious penguin made me more interested in studying her behaviour. The excitement she expressed was akin to seeing a long lost friend and being united after years of undesired separation. And, no matter how many times I review the photo, the image continues to evoke this strong feeling of passion and excitement.

This is one of the photos I shot during my last week at the zoo for the month of January and certainly it is one of my favourites. I love this photo.

Nestled for Warmth

Nestled for Warmth
Nestled for Warmth

Taking advantage of the fair Sunday weather and to shoot with some photography friends, I ventured to the zoo. I had already made up my mind that in spite of my still fragile condition – recovering from a flu – I was still going to take the chance, brave the 46F weather and go shooting. Incidentally, there was a photo contest going on at the zoo. An annual winter contest which brings hordes of photographers from amateur to professional to shoot at the zoo and I was out there rubbing elbows with the best and worst of them.

It made no difference to me whether there was a contest going on or not, I was out for one reason – to make art with light and I think this photograph reflects that. Here I captured a duck in one of the many pools nestled in its own feathers for warmth just slightly off shore of the pond hence the title Nestled for Warmth.

Chittenango Falls Revisited

Chittenango Falls Revisited
Chittenango Falls Revisited

Back in 2010, I bought myself a circular polarizer and with unequivocal excitement I went out shooting like mad. Among one of the places I visited and made use of the polarizer was the Chittenango Falls. The photo I composed and took that day is available in the park walks collection of the portfolio.

This year, January 1, I was invited out by three other photographer friends for a New Year shoot-out. One of the many places we visited was, you guessed it, Chittenango Falls. Was I excited this second time around, you bet I was. This time around I had another toy to play with a graduated neutral density filter which helped me to keep everything within the range the sensor. But enough with the technical talk and lets get down to the image.

Having gotten to the falls, I felt that I needed to take something different which still emphasized the significance of the falls. And, after searching around, I settled on this composition which not only displayed the falls but the environs. Further, the low level of the sun as it broke through the forest trees and lit the grounds of the walkway already suggests that it was early in the morning; It was. But, it was beautiful, it was refreshing and was a fitting way to start the new year – taking photos with friends at the start of the new year.