Tag Archives: Black & White

Take a Bow

Take a Bow
Take a Bow

Yet another venture into studying forms which occur naturally in nature, I decided to observe the curves of fiddle-heads. I liked the very simple and clean curved structures of these young ferns and more importantly to see them juxtaposed against one another.

Because of a simple gut feeling, I chose to go with a sepia toning of this image. It just felt that it helped expressed the content more and provides a non-distracting background colouring to the scene. I will also add that flat lighting, due to an overcast day, also helped create this somewhat surreal background as well.

The photo was shot at Beaver Lake Park while taking the lake loop trail which should have taken 1 hour.  But beware,  if you are photographing; the trip will probably take 3 and  1/2 hours.

The Folds

The Folds
The Folds

This is an oldy but a goody. I had spent quite a few days thinking through how I wanted to edit this photo. But after much observation, I decided to settle on something simple but, I think, adequate.

Back on April 22, I took a trip with companion photographers Joe Inzalaco and Lynne Fordham to Derby Hill Observatory on the shores of lake Ontario. Part of the observatory descends into a forest area with a slightly cleared walking path. It was a bit damp, and in some places I felt I was playing a game of hop-scotch as I tried to avoid the muddier parts of the path. But, it was well worth the effort. I found the immense diversity of plants in that woodland path pretty rich and  I found some lovely geometrical structures, like the one displayed on the left.

I was captivated by the way the leaves unfolded from the centre forming this ever growing spiral of leaf blades which protruded outward. There could have been any number of ways in which I could have photographed this plant but breaking all the conventional rules of composition, I decided to put it right smack in the centre. It just felt like that made the best display of the composition given the subject. But, I will let you be the judge.

For anyone who plans to visit Derby Hill Bird Observatory, I definitely recommend taking a walk around the woodland areas of the hill. It is well worth exploring and seeing what else is out there. But, please, whatever you do, carry some boots. You will thank me later for that.

Sodus Point Light House

Sodus Point Light House
Sodus Point Light House

There is something classical and enduring about light houses. Something about them suggest a metaphorical statement of an enduring light during the darkest times; Or, a spotlight to point the way and steer you clear of danger. This is the same feeling I get whenever I review this photo I took three weeks back at Sodus Point, NY. Sodus Point is a small bay town which sits on the shores of Lake Ontrario in Central New York. If you were to ever visit, the place looks like it sprang from an old fishing village.  I truly don’t know the full history of the town and to really learn that I would have to get that information from one of the locals which I did not have much opportunity to do.

But, back to the lighthouse and its appeal. The photo on the left truly doesn’t do it any justice as I had to crop it somewhat so that the lighthouse would be visible. However, the brooding dark sky really added to its appeal and added atmosphere to the scene that was better experienced rather than simply shot on camera.

What the photograph does not indicate is the frigid, windy temperatures that had to be endured to capture this. I took several shots of this lighthouse because the wind was so strong and constant, that my camera would shake even though it was placed on a steady tripod. I even took extra precautionary steps to avoid camera shake by using my remote trigger. Using the remote trigger also helped me to keep my poor digits warm too. In the end though, I was satisfied with the result and I present it here – the Sodus Point Light House.

The Stare

The Stare
The Stare

Aren’t there days when you feel like this guy. Like someone ticks you off to the highest level of tick-tivity but rather than blow your top you just stare at them. The cold, long stoic stare that this lion had reminded me a lot of that emotion and I could not hesitate but capture that.

Personally, I think he was more concerned about having had to come out in the snow covered pen. I bet he was thinking – “Oh crap, not this snow again!” But, I will leave you to guess what he is thinking and enjoy The Stare.

Penguin Passion

Penguin Passion
Penguin Passion

By nature, penguins are curious animals. Once someone or something enters their personal space they start investigating. Children are just as curious. So what happens when two equally curious creatures meet? – a moment of excitement which I think I captured here in “Penguin Passion”.

I will have to say that this young girl really inspired me. Just seeing how interested and excited she was in encountering this curious penguin made me more interested in studying her behaviour. The excitement she expressed was akin to seeing a long lost friend and being united after years of undesired separation. And, no matter how many times I review the photo, the image continues to evoke this strong feeling of passion and excitement.

This is one of the photos I shot during my last week at the zoo for the month of January and certainly it is one of my favourites. I love this photo.

Reindeer Games

Reindeer Games
Reindeer Games

This is yet another photo which I took while on “safari” at the Rosemund Gifford Zoo. I say safari as this is what it felt like while I was out there taking photos. I stalked this reindeer for about 15 minutes before he finally lifted his head and turned around. Yes, I was playing the role of a zoo paparazzi. Prior to that, he had been foraging for grass. I honestly believed that he was toying with me, not giving me the shot that I wanted; Hence the name Reindeer Games.

With very little to add interest to the photo, I chose to use the reindeer’s own feature – it’s spine – to act as a leading line drawing an imaginary path to his head. Thankfully, the overcast skies ensurde that I didn’t endure too much over exposure and I was basically able to keep everything balanced.

Now, if only I could find one with a brilliant red nose.

Sitting in the Dark

Sitting in the Dark

Everyone who welcomes the new year lives in the anticipation of something brighter, better, worthwhile. Indeed, with everything that has happened over the past 12 months everyone is looking forward to something better and more upbeat with the new year.. Although this photograph’s title says something otherwise, it also depicts that that brighter times are still yet to come and just ahead.

I have wanted to put this photograph up for quite some time now and it was shot over the Christmas Season during the Lights on the Lake show which is held at the Onondaga Lake annually. In the same way that it depicts a bright pathway ahead, I wish everyone a bright New Year.  Happy New Year!!

Canastota Windmills

Canastota Windmills
Canastota Windmills

Last week, I wrote of thedilapidated shed in the field of the Finger Lakes region.The Finger Lakes region right now is under a lot of debate as there is discussion to make the site an are for hydrofacking in Central New York.This may mean that the beautiful fields and amazing sunsets that was depicted in the previous photo may one day be replaced by heavy industrializaion as the quest fo energy continues in the US.

However, in Canastota, the residents have taken a different approach to energy genreation. The have chosen to share their corn fields with massive wind driven turbine generators. In this photo I have chosen to experiment a bit with the Ansel Adams style of photo enhancements with rich black skies which contrast with clouds with varying levels of gray depicting deptth and density. This was just an experiment but I think it was well executed for this test.

The Ol’ Southern Belle

Ol' Southern Belle
Ol’ Southern Belle

Here is another image from what I think may become a series which I refer to as the Uncivil War. Pictured here is a portrait of one of the women dressed in the attire of what would have been a southern belle on the confederate side of the Civil War. And, being true to the nature of the women of that era, she had the accent and the attitude of one.

Unlike most of the reenactors at this event, she seemed to have more energy than anyone else. Personally, I wish I had more time to study her as I think she would have yielded numerous great photographs.

Fallen Petals Revisited

Fallen Petals Revisited
Fallen Petals Revisited

Some years ago, I created an image of a wilting rose which had lost it petals. It was not a particularly engaging photograph but it was not a bad one either. It just felt like it lacked something interesting about it.  Over the course of this summer, I decided to revisit the subject matter in an attempt to create an interesting photograph which captured the essence of the fragility of a flower’s beauty.

I present this here with two similar flowers juxtaposed against each other but at different stages of development. On the left we have one flower which has blossomed and on the right, one which is on  its last petal. Although the second flower has already blossomed and is on its decline, to me it demonstrates its own beauty through strength as  it clings to its last surviving petal as if to say, I am not past my prime yet.